Posts Tagged ‘SEO’

Improve Search Ranking With Google Analytics Advanced Segments

Sunday, February 22nd, 2009

Last time I wrote about using Google Analytics to boost your AdSense earnings, this time I am going to show you a simple process where you can use Google Analytics Advanced Segments feature to methodically improve your search engines ranking.

How To Find Web Pages With The Most Search Traffic

First let’s find your top performing web pages with the most search engines traffic. Here’s how you’ll find that information from your Google Analytics account:

  • Click on Content
  • Click on Top Content
  • On the upper right, click Segment


  • Uncheck All Visits and select Search Traffic
  • Click Apply

You’ll see a screen similar to the one below — note that I filtered mine for privacy reason. Note that you now know your top performing web pages in term of search traffic, and can expand the list to see more results.


How To Find Top Performing Keywords For Your Web Page

Take note of these top search traffic articles and follow these steps to find top performing keywords:

  • Click on the URL link under the “Page” column
  • In the Analyze pull down, select Entrance Keywords
  • In the Content pull down, search for and select your chosen article

You’ll see a screen similar to the one below that shows all of the keywords for that particular article with all the vital statistics.


How To Improve Search Traffic With Google Analytics Advanced Segment Data

This is a very powerful piece of information that you are looking at, and there are several things you could do to leverage it. Here are a few ideas you can use to improve your search engines ranking using the data provided.

1. Keywords Optimization

You can start by rewriting the article to emphasize these top keywords.  Make sure they appear in important places like the title, first paragraph, meta description, headings, etc. You also want them to appear a few times in your content so that you can achieve a 3-5% keywords density.

If you want to rank well for a particular key phrase, then make sure you optimize the key phrase verbatim as per the suggestion above. For example, if I want to rank well for “new frugal ideas”, then I should have that exact phrase “new frugal ideas” appears a few times and in the headings, first paragraph, etc.

2. Link To This Article From Other Articles Using Various Keywords

Another approach is to link to this article using the keywords you’d like to improve from existing articles within your site, or better yet, from other web sites. Of course, the former is easier, but the latter is much more powerful.

3. Write Follow Up Article

Another idea is to write a brand new article that target similar keywords — i.e., an update to the original article, or a different look at the same idea, etc. In this new article, you also want to link back to the original article using the most important keywords as the anchor text. However, limit the number of links to 1-2.

If you’re lucky enough, you may even get the valuable indented search listing.


These are just a few examples of how you can optimize your web page, and there are other optimization ideas that you can apply to leverage the information made available by Google Analytics Advanced Segments.

Another nice touch about Analytics is the ability to change your timeframe on the fly so that you can see if what you’re doing is actually helping or hurting your site search ranking. However, try to keep your timeframe long enough so that you’re not fooled by daily fluctuation.

Remove Dead Links From Your Blog To Improve User Experience

Saturday, January 31st, 2009

After blogging for a while, you will notice two inevitable trends.  One, other bloggers that you used to link to, or leave comment on your blog with links to their site stop blogging.  And two, some of your advertisers — specifically affiliate advertisers — stop running their program.  In both cases, when your visitors follow these links, they are either going to a dormant web site or a parked domain — both of which contributes to bad user experience.

If you follow these bloggers, or if you get a notice from your advertisers, there are a few things that you should do.  In the case of other bloggers, I don’t generally go through these steps until the blog is completely dead; specifically, I’ll keep the links as long as the site is up.  Here are the steps that I go through:

  • Clean Up Your Blogroll — First, if the blogger is in my blogroll, I’ll remove the blog.  It’s also a good idea to periodically go through your blogroll to see if you are linking to any dead sites.
  • Clean Up Your Posts — Second, I search my posts for the dead blog.  In WordPress admin menu, click on Posts > Edit and do a search — i.e., “”.   Then I go in and either remove the link noting that it’s no longer around, or completely delete any reference to that blog.
  • Clean Up Your Comments — Third, I do a similar search in the comment section, and remove the dead URL from comments.

This used to be tedious, but WordPress 2.7 made this easier with “Quick Edit” function.  Now you may ask if this is worth the effort.  Personally, I think it is.  First, it shows that you care about your blog and your are keeping it current.  Second, your user are not visiting parked domain, or worse, domains that have been turned into spam sites or Made for AdSense sites.  Third, if you are concerned about SEO, it will cut down the number of unnecessary outgoing links.

One of the free tool you can use to detect dead links on your site is Xenu’s Link Sleuth (TM).

Do you go through your blog to clean up dead links?  Do you think it’s worth it?

Content And Usability Before Blog Promotion

Monday, September 8th, 2008

I occasionally come across new bloggers who are eager to generate traffic to their blog.  They become focused on blog promotion and SEO before their blog is ready. I applaud their efforts, but I think it’s a mistake to promote your blog to prematurely.

Photo by Kelly Asmodee via Flickr

A good web site should serves a purpose.  For instance, a commercial site’s purpose might be selling some sort of products.  Without a well designed site, catalog of products, easy-to-use navigation, and secure eCommerce system, there’s no point in promoting the site because all the effort will be for naught.  Likewise, your blog serves a purpose — may be you want it to tell your story, share your interest or your expertise.  The commonality is that all blogs need some kind of content; as such, you should have at least a few good posts on your blog before you even attempt to promote it. And don’t even worry about SEO until you have sizable number of posts.

In addition to content, you should also design the blog for usability.  In general, blogs are well designed out of the box, but there are a few things you could do to improve it further:

  • Choose a professional looking theme
  • Navigation is clear and consistent
  • Feed subscription button is clearly visible, preferably above the fold
  • Search box is available and easy to find
  • Archive is easily accessible (I prefer a simple link in the navigation bar that links to a full archive page)
  • There is no unfinished posts
  • All links are working

By focusing on your content and usability first, you are giving your visitors good reasons to become readers, and hopefully, they’ll come back in the future.

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Get More Search Traffic With Keywords Optimization

Saturday, August 16th, 2008

If you have been blogging for a while, chances are you’ve been getting some traffic from search engines. For example, based on Google Analytics my personal finance blog received 12,707 total visits via 8,513 keywords in the past 30 days — of which, the top 50 keywords produced 4,876 visits (or 38%).

Photo by Spiritokko via Flickr

What can we derive from this information?

  1. It’s a mistake to focus on a few keywords. I often see new webmasters trying to rank for a handful of specific keywords that describe their sites. For example, I could’ve tried to rank Moolanomy for “personal finance blog” or “investing blog”, but that’s not where traffic will be coming from.
  2. Long tail keywords and search traffic are powerful. There are limitless numbers of search terms and you’ll not be able to anticipate them. So one of the best search engine optimization (SEO) strategies is to write as much high quality content as you can. Think of content as fishing net, and more content is like having a bigger net that allows you to capture more search engines traffic.
  3. Top 50 keywords give you the most return for your effort. It’s likely that a major portion of your search engines visitors found your blog through one of the top 50 keywords, so there’s a good opportunity for keywords optimization in this area.

How To Choose Which Keywords To Optimize

If you have to choose just 10 keywords to optimize, how would you do it? Personally, I don’t have unlimited resources so I try to focus on efforts that provide the best return on investment. In this example, I will show you how I identify the top 10 keywords that I feel will provide me with the most search engines traffic.

1. Identify your top 50 keywords and the amount of traffic for each

This is an easy exercise if you use Google Analytics. Just a few clicks and you’ll have access to this list. You can simply copy and paste the result into a spreadsheet. Here’s a small sample of my top 50 keywords.

Keywords Hits
passive income ideas 204
frugal ideas 179
extra income 103
larry swedroe 99
dave ramsey 93
frugal tips 92

When you are doing this, you’ll be doing it for all 50 keywords in order to get the final 10.

2. Identify current search engines ranking for your top 50 keywords

Next, I am going to add the search engines ranking for each keyword into the spreadsheet. For this exercise, I usually stick to Google search result since it’s my biggest source of search engines traffic. Moreover, to simplify the task, I recommend Digital Point Search Engine Keyword Tracker & Keyword Ranking Tool.

Updated 4/19/2009: You may no longer be able to get Google API needed for this application to work. If that’s the case, you’ll have to track it manually. You top keywords tend to be in the top 20 SERP positions so this is just a bit of extra work.

This is what my spreadsheet looks like after I add search engines rankings:

Keywords Hits Rank
passive income ideas 204 1
frugal ideas 179 3
extra income 103 10
larry swedroe 99 1
dave ramsey 93 18
frugal tips 92 16

If you run into keywords that you cannot identify the rank — i.e., not in top 100 — you can simply enter 999 for the purpose of this exercise.

3. Calculate the Keyword ROI Score

To calculate the keyword ROI score, you just multiple the number of hits by rank. The logic behind this is to focus on keywords with highest traffic hits, but lowest ranks.

Keywords Hits Rank ROI
passive income ideas 204 1 204
frugal ideas 179 3 537
extra income 103 10 1030
larry swedroe 99 1 99
dave ramsey 93 18 1674
frugal tips 92 16 1472

Note: With 50 keywords, the easiest thing to do is sort the list by ROI and look at the top 10 rows. You should skip any row with rank of “999” to find the top 10 with the best chance of improving.

Based on the example above, I should work on keywords like “dave ramsey”, “frugal tips”, and “extra income” instead of “frugal ideas”, “passive income ideas”, and “larry swedroe”.

How To Optimize Keywords For Better Search Engines Ranking

Now that you know the top 10 keywords you’d like to work with, there are a few things that you could do to improve your search engines ranking. For example, since I know that my article Extra Income Guide rank #10 in Google for “extra income”, I could do a few things to optimize it for better search ranking. Here are a few things that you could do to improve your blog article:

  1. Install All in One SEO plugin to optimize the title. Also it will add META keywords and META description to your post.
  2. Change the title of the page to include the word “extra income”
  3. Add headings — i.e., H2 and H3 — to include the word “extra income”
  4. Write custom META description for the post. Note, All in One SEO will use the first few sentences of your post, but this is not always the best META description.
  5. Add and/or modify tags in your post. Note, All in One SEO uses your tags as META keywords
  6. Search for the word “extra income” within the blog and link to your targeted article
  7. Ask your friends to link to the article using the keyword as anchor text

So there it is…a basic strategy on how to get more search traffic with keyword optimization.

Free Website Magazines and SEO White Papers

Friday, June 20th, 2008

Recently, I have partnered up with to provide Blogthority readers with free website magazines and SEO white papers. In order to get these magazines and whitepapers, you’d have to qualify by provide with brief demographic information (about 5 minutes worth of work). If you qualify, then the magazines and whitepapers are yours for free.

Here are some of the recommended magazines and white papers:

Website Magazine

Has tapped premier talent in the Internet industry for our content and each and every issue will contain practical advice…

Search Engine Optimization for E-commerce Sites: The Seven Most Common Pitfalls

Learn to attract the right level of online client…

Search Engine Optimization and Web 2.0

Don’t fall into the “Web 2.0 will fix SEO for our site trap.” Find out how to address common…

Search Engine Optimization and Pay-Per-Click: A Holistic Approach

Learn how pay-per-click (PPC) and natural search engine optimization (SEO)…

12 SEO Campaign Killers

Learn what not to do when launching a Search Engine Optimization (SEO) campaign to attract more visitors, leads and…

Be sure to check out the full selections and don’t miss the opportunity to get these free magazines.

How To Grow A New Blog Efficiently

Tuesday, February 19th, 2008

This article contains some information and ideas that I have about how to grow a small or new blog efficiently. Unfortunately writing good content is not enough — there are so many blogs out there that you have to do some extra work in order to get noticed. These ideas are more effective on smaller blogs so as your blog grows then you can modify or omit items.

promote new blog
Photo by Mtchm via Flickr


It’s been said before and I’ll say it again: without reasonably good regular content then your traffic growth will be sluggish at best. Write about topics that interest you and hopefully you know something about.

A few ideas about content:

  • Focussed or not? — Some people say that blogs with a narrow range of topics are more successful. Personally I don’t worry about it — if something interests you then write about it.
  • Length — When I started on a blog and was posting five times a week I decided to try to do posts that were 300-500 words in length. I didn’t want them too short and I didn’t want them too long. Because if they were, I’d rather split them up and post them over two days. Now that I’m sharing a blog I don’t worry about the length as much, but I do think that posts that are too long might be detrimental to growing traffic since most readers don’t really want to read a book when they are browsing their reader. On the other hand it can be a bit annoying when you check out a new post on a blog and they have written a two sentence reminder to themselves or something equally silly which I’ve seen many times.
  • Think up ideas in advance — It amazes me when I hear about bloggers who regularly sit down in the evening and think up an idea and then write a post on it. I suppose this has to do with individual style but I like to think up most of my ideas in advance and I hate writing last minute posts.
  • Avoid burnout – If you post twice a week for a year then you will have a much larger following then if you post seven days a week for three months. If you want to be a blogger for the long term then you have to pace yourself. Even taking a week off now and again (maybe not right in the beginning however) is not a bad idea.

Posting schedule

This is an interesting topic since not everyone agrees about how often a blogger should post. My blog posts five days a week which is facilitated by the fact that there are two writers so we only write every second day. My feeling on this topic is that you don’t have to post five times a week to grow your audience — two or three times a week should be sufficient.

I would however suggest that you follow a schedule — i.e., for twice a week then post the same two days each week. Avoiding burnout is a key goal of a beginning blogger so if posting three times a week feels comfortable then do three times a week. There is nothing gained if you struggle to post five times a week (or more) and then end up quitting the blog after a frustrating few months.

RSS Icon

See that orange square in the upper right side of the screen? That’s a FeedBurner icon and it allows readers to easily subscribe to your feed. This is very important because making it easier for readers to read your posts when they are published will increase your readership. Get one!


Carnivals are one of the best ways for a new blog to get new readers. I’ve found the Carnival of Personal Finance to be the best for my personal finance blog but Festival of Frugality is also quite good. Other PF carnivals to consider are Carnival of Money Stories, Carnival of Financial Goals, and Money Hacks Carnival.

Whatever your blog is about — there are probably carnivals covering that topic. If not then start one of your own at Blog Carnival!

Some suggestions regarding carnivals:

  • Don’t wait — I don’t care if you only have two posts up — start submitting now!
  • Submit often — Especially in the beginning you should be submitting every week.
  • Concentrate on bigger blogs if you don’t submit regularly — The most traffic the blog gets, the better your chances for some referrals.
  • Submit early — Putting in a late submission means the host may not read your post and will probably “bury” it at the bottom of the list. The higher up the page your submission is, the more referrals you will get.
  • Appropriate topic — Try to pick the best posts for the right carnival. If you are really keen you can even try to write posts with a particular carnival in mind but this is not something I do.
  • Match your post to the host — Take a look at the host blog and see what kind of material they are into. If a host looks like they are not into your favorite topic then try to find something else to submit. If you don’t submit regularly then try to submit a post when the host blog has similar topics to yours. If the host really likes your submission then they will often use it in their “editor’s picks” which will be (hopefully) featured at the top of the page where you will get the most referrals.

Hosting carnivals

This is a lot of work but it can really raise the profile of your blog because:

  • You will get a lot of traffic and will get noticed
  • Getting links to your blog raises your profile with Google which will help you in the long run

Try to pick carnivals that are appropriate to your subject manner and look for smaller carnivals in the beginning because the more popular ones tend to choose more established bloggers to be their hosts. I have yet to host a carnival but I’ve signed up to do three in the next few months so I shall see how it goes.

Comments on other blogs

This is a great way to market your blog. Some suggestions for leaving comments:

  • Correct info — Make sure you fill in the name of your blog and the correct URL.
  • Usefulness — Write a meaningful comment on the post. Things like “great post” are not going to get you any traffic.
  • Relevancy — The more relevant the post is to your blog then the more likely it is that a good comment will get some referrals. Someone who is reading the comments is definitely interested in the topic so if you look like you are interested in that topic as well then they might check out your blog. On the same idea — focus on blogs that are similar to your own.
  • Blog size — Comment on medium sized blogs. Commenting on large blogs is often a waste of time since there are too many comments and it seems like nobody reads any of them! By the same token, a small blog will not have enough traffic to make it worthwhile commenting if it’s traffic that you want. I’m not suggesting that you shouldn’t comment on very small or very big blogs if you want to but the traffic potential will be less.

Link to other blogs

This is a key tool and is part of networking with other bloggers. Bloggers love to get recognized and praised (at least I do) so if you write a post and include a link to one of their posts then they will often come and check out your blog. Ideally if they like your blog and hopefully start reading it, then they will put some links to your blog in one of their posts which can be an excellent source of traffic. As I mentioned with the comments, medium sized blogs will probably provide the best results for this strategy.

Read other blogs

If you want to comment on, link to and network other bloggers then you have to know what they write about so make sure you read at least a few blogs regularly.

Network with other bloggers

This usually takes the form of emailing other bloggers — you can comment on a post, tell them you like their blog, ask for advice etc. This won’t work with every blogger but it can serve as a great learning tool and can also lead to more links — and you might even make some good friends.

Guest posts

This is another area where I will be venturing for the first time in the next few weeks. From discussions with other bloggers this can be a good source of new readers. Guest posts take time so this shouldn’t be done at the expense of your own content. Again, try to match the subject content of the blog you will be guest posting on to your own for maximum benefit.

Here too I would say try to go for medium sized blogs — they are likely to be receptive to a guest post and if their content is similar to your own then this strategy could be quite beneficial.

Advertisement on your blog

I would suggest that you not bother with any advertising when you start a blog for the following reasons:

  • No money — You need traffic to make money with advertisement on your blog, so until your blog has a chance to grow there is no benefit to having advertising.
  • Aesthetics — Advertisement on your blog almost always has a detrimental effect on the way a blog looks. This is an acceptable trade off for an established blog but for a new blog you are better off without ads. It’s kind of like a first date — you want to look as good as possible!


Search Engine Optimization is a fascinating subject but for a new blog I would completely ignore it. You will have plenty of time later on to get into this topic. Time spent on SEO is time not spent on content or marketing which is a mistake for a new blog.

Social Networks

Social networks are a great way to generate traffic and new readers. StumbleUpon in particular has been pretty effective for me. I would say that this might not be the best route for a brand new blog but keep it in mind and maybe after a few months, start looking into it.


If you try to do all of the above items in a big way then that would take a lot of time which doesn’t fit with the “efficient” theme of the post. I would concentrate on the following items for maximum benefit:

  • Content — This has to be the top priority.
  • Carnivals — These don’t take much time to enter so this will help grow your blog efficiently.
  • RSS icon — This doesn’t take long to set up.
  • Link to and comment on other bigger blogs.
  • Networking – It’s hard to go wrong with getting know other bloggers.

None of these suggestions are “all or none” propositions. If you want to enter three carnivals a week then go ahead. If you only want to enter one carnival every three weeks then that is fine too. Whether it’s entering a carnival, adding an extra link to to a post or emailing another blogger — every little bit counts.

How to Find the Right WordPress Theme

Tuesday, February 5th, 2008

Whoa, is there such a thing as the wrong WordPress theme? Sadly, the answer is yes. There are literally thousands of themes out there. There are some really good ones, and inevitably, there are some bad ones too.

Moolanomy Theme

Where to find WordPress themes

Before I show you what make a theme bad, I would like to share some resources where you can find WordPress themes:

10 Signs of Bad WordPress Themes

This is not a hard and fast rule, and certain flaws are worse than others — also, some could be fixed with relative ease. Note that my theme doesn’t pass all the tests either, but I know where the problems are and I am working on it. In other word, you may have a tough time finding the perfect theme that passes all these 10 points.

  1. Ugly — I know beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. So you have to decide on this one. If it’s ugly, move on and don’t even bother.
  2. Doesn’t stand out — Another design problem is using a theme that looks the same as everyone else’s. Worse, you have a theme that look very similar to the more popular blogs in your niche. Your theme is an important part of your brand, so it’s worth investing a little time to make yours stand out.
  3. Bandwidth hog — Some themes have too many images, large CSS file, add-on JavaScript files, and large HTML files. Make sure that what you are getting is worth the bandwidth usage. To check your theme bandwidth efficiency, check out Web Page Analyzer from Web Site Optimization. If you use Firefox, try Firebug and YSlow add-ons combination (awesome!). Some tips on reducing bandwidth usage:
    • Reduce the number of images, scripts, and external CSS file (each image takes at least 1 HTTP request)
    • Optimize images to make them smaller
    • Reduce the size of CSS file — i.e., using Clean CSS — or you can do it on your own by stripping out comments, extra spaces, reduce long-hand coding to their short-hand equivalents, etc.
    • Eliminate unnecessary clutters from your blog — i.e., links, text, images, widgets, clicklets, etc.
  4. Database hog — Some themes can make a lot of unnecessary calls to the database. For example, Tigopedia Reloaded uses only 2 database calls compared to its predecessor that uses 30+ calls. Other than that, judicious use of plug-ins will also help reducing database usage.
  5. Invalid HTML — This is probably one of the easiest problems to fix. Unfortunately, some theme designers don’t even take the time to validate their code. To check if your theme validates, try the W3C Markup Validation Service. You can use the “show source” option to help you track down and fix problems.
  6. Invalid CSS — This is similar problem to the HTML validation. To check your CSS validation, try the W3C CSS Validation Service.
  7. Poorly optimized for search engines — There are many articles about how to optimize WordPress for search engines, but when it comes to theme, we are dealing mainly with location of content relative to other code, use of headings, and use of links. In general, good theme has the following characteristics:
    • Present main content first and sidebar(s) afterward
    • Use only one H1 heading for the post title (some may argue using H1 for blog title, but I think it’s more advantageous to use H1 for post title)
    • Use links sparingly and link directly to the post title
  8. Poor separation of content and design — Good theme should make good use of id and class attributes. It should have very little style declaration inside the template files itself. Also, CSS and JavaScript code should be in separate files and not included with the main HTML page.
  9. Inflexible (hard to modify) — Code should be clean, well formatted, and strategically commented. I have tried several themes in the past and there are some that are so hard to work with, I simply stop using them.
  10. Portable — One of the common problems I see when visiting blogs through a portable device (e.g., a blackberry) is bad rendering. Occasionally, I will see blog showing broken CSS code before I can get to the content. If you have an opportunity, check your site through a portable device and see for yourself. To get an idea on how your blog appears on text only or portable device, try Lynx Viewer.

I hope this post help you find your next theme. Before I go, I also want to share a really cool plug-in called Admin Theme Preview. This plug-in let your blog runs uninterrupted, while you can work on a new theme in the background.

12 Essential Companion Accounts for a Successful Blog

Friday, February 1st, 2008

Aside from the standard accounts for your blog — i.e., domain name, web hosting, and WordPress — there are several companion accounts that I think are very useful. Below are 12 essential companion accounts, plus two that are worth mentioning.

For Money and Monetization

  • PayPal – This is an online payment web site that allows you to accept money and credit card for products or services that you sell. I have used PayPal to accept payments, pay other online service providers, and even accept donation for my free products.
  • Google AdSense – This is service allows you to display advertisement on your blog and you will get paid for both impression paid and click through. You can see Google AdSense ads everywhere, including the ones on this blog. This is perhaps one of the best monetization tools available for blogger today.
  • Amazon Associates – This program allows you to sell products and earn up to 10% commission. This hasn’t been a big money maker for me, but I heard some people have done really well with it.
  • Commission Junction – This program allows you to pick products and services from hundreds of advertisers. Each advertiser offers different referral plan, so you will have to read each one. Like Amazon Associates, it hasn’t been a big money maker for me, but it’s a decent option.

For Subscribers Count and Management

  • FeedBurner – Their service basically put your RSS feed on steroid. With its companion FeedBurner FeedSmith plug-in for WordPress, it allows you to accurately measure the number of subscribers. I use it to consolidate my subscribers count, accept subscribers via email, monetize my RSS feed, and show off the number of subscribers. However, there are a lot of great capabilities and I haven’t fully explored them all yet.

For Traffic and Networking

  • Stumble Upon – This is probably the best social site at the moment. I enjoy stumbling to find new and interesting sites (note: I choose the topics, so I only look at a blogging and finance sites). To get a network going, gives thumb ups to sites that you like, leave a comment, and add other people who gave thumb up to the same sites as your friend. If you have a group of friends, you can submit each other sites to stumble upon for some traffic — however, don’t over do it and only submit your best work.
  • Technorati – This is a blog search engine and tag search service. When you use tags on your blog (note: tagging is a native feature in WP 2.3.x) and ping Technorati with updates, people who uses Technorati can perform searches and easily find you blog. I occasional use Technorati to find other “on topic” blog articles to link to.

For Search Engines Optimization

  • Google Sitemap – This is part of Google Webmaster Toolkit. The program allows you to check many important aspects about how well search engine spiders (specifically Googlebot) can go through your blog and index it for searches. There are also many interesting tools within this site — e.g., report that track top search queries and top search positions for your blog.

For Statistics and Traffic Analysis

  • Google Analytics – This is a statistic tracking tool that shows many useful information such as the number of visitors from various sources, page views, search terms, most viewed page on your blog, etc. This is a good way to find out which articles your readers like, where your traffic is coming from, etc.
  • Site Meter – Another good and simple statistic and analysis package. I use this concurrently with Google Analytics. I like the hour-by-hour reporting. It’s quite addictive.
  • Crazy Egg – This tool allows you to visualize clicks on any web page on your site. It’s a great tool to help you understand users’ behavior. I use this tool to help me determine how I can move elements on my blog around to maximize usability and revenue potential.

For Spam Protection

  • – You will need to set up an account with them in order to get the WordPress API key needed from plug-ins like Akismet and Stats. And you don’t want to run your blog without Akismet, so the account is essential.


  • MyBlogLog – This is a community that allows you to connect with your readers. If you install their widget on your blog (I don’t do this due to clutter), you can see people with MyBlogLog account that visited your blog recently. A good use of MyBlogLog is to make sure you are logged in so that your avatar shows up when you visit other blogs. You can get small amount of traffic this way.
  • BlogCatalog – This site also provides similar services to MyBlogLog, but with very robust discussion forums where you can meet and network with other bloggers.

If you have other companion accounts that you use to help improve your blog performance, please share it here.